Friday, March 14, 2008

Free Tibet - Boycott the 2008 Beijing Olympics

The people of Tibet want China to allow them autonomy. People all over the world support the Tibetan people's right to this freedom but the Chinese government won't budge.  During the Beijing Olympics, many protests were held, including ones along the path of the Olympic torch.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/olympics/2516008/Beijing-Olympics-Tibetans-and-Nepalis-stage-anti-China-protests-as-Olympic-Games-loom.html


*Originally I had linked an article with pictures from Yahoo.com.  The article is no longer available and the pictures, obviously aren't either.  So, instead I present a similar alternative article:

http://blog.studentsforafreetibet.org/2007/04/unprecedented-high-altitude-free-tibet-protest-on-mount-everest/









Tibet Activists Demonstrate at Base Camp While Chinese Team Attempts Olympic Torch Ascent






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Protests Turn Violent in Tibet (yahoo.com)
(This is text that I saved locally on my blog from the original article) 
 

Tibetan protesters hold a candlelit vigil as part of an anti-China demonstration at Boadha in Kathmandu. Around 2,000 Tibetan exiles held a candlelit vigil in Nepal's capital to show support for protesters in Chinese-controlled Tibet. The Tibetan capital Lhasa erupted in deadly violence as security forces used gunfire to quell the biggest protests against Chinese rule in two decades. (AFP/Prakash Mathema)

Tents at an advance base camp of Mount Everest in May 2007. Nepal will block access to Mount Everest in May to prevent pro-Tibetan protests while China takes the Olympic torch to the roof of the world. (AFP/HO)

Sunday, March 9, 2008

The New Job - Part 2.1

I've been gainfully employed now for a month and one week and for the most part I am enjoying it. The work itself is a lot of hands on work with fossils; so far I've worked on Triceratops, T-Rex, and most recently Phytosaur (pre-dinosaur) material. This Phytosaur was originally recovered and reconstructed in the 30s using a terracotta clay to connect the few sections of actual bone together. It has been in storage for years after probably being on display in the Museum a long time ago. Now, it has been explored, the real bone cleaned up and defined, so that we can use it for display again in the near future.

P.S. My computer is so slow that it took me the better part of the day to get this published because the photos gave me so much trouble... to be continued very soon!